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BASEBALL!
Notes on the National Pastime
Page 42
"Ninety feet between bases is perhaps as close as man has ever come to perfection."
-- Red Smith, columnist
"TAKE ME OUT TO THE BALL GAME"
Katie Casey was base ball mad.
Had the fever and had it bad;
Just to root for the home town crew,
Ev'ry sou Katie blew.
On a Saturday, her young beau
Called to see if she'd like to go,
To see a show but Miss Kate said,
"No, I'll tell you what you can do."
"Take me out to the ball game,
Take me out with the crowd.
Buy me some peanuts and cracker jack,
I don't care if I never get back,
Let me root, root, root for the home team,
If they don't win it's a shame.
For it's one, two, three strikes, you're out,
At the old ball game."
Katie Casey saw all the games,
Knew the players by their first names;
Told the umpire he was wrong,
All along good and strong.
When the score was just two to two,
Katie Casey knew what to do,
Just to cheer up the boys she knew,
She made the gang sing this song:
"Take me out to the ball game,
Take me out with the crowd.
Buy me some peanuts and cracker jack,
I don't care if I never get back,
Let me root, root, root for the home team,
If they don't win it's a shame.
For it's one, two, three strikes, your out,
At the old ball game."
Author: Jay Norworth
Composer: Albert Von Tilzer
Published: 1908, 1927
York Music Company

Norworth was a successful entertainer and songwriter ("Shine on, Harvest Moon") when he wrote this classic on a subway train bound for Manhattan. He was reputedly inspired by a sign that read "Ballgame Today at the Polo Grounds." It took Norworth fifteen minutes to write the lyrics. (Von Tilzer then put the words to music.) It was performed by Norworth's wife, Nora Bayes, at the Ziegfried Follies and, by 1910, was a staple at all big league ballparks. It's said that only "The Star Spangled Banner" and "Happy Birthday" are sung more often than "Take Me Out to the Ball Game."
Neither Norworth nor Von Tilzer had ever actually seen a baseball game before creating the song.
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