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BASEBALL!
Notes on the National Pastime
Page 16
THEY PLAYED THE GAME (1)
Babe Adams
(1906-26)
Adams threw three complete-game victories for the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 1909 World Series with the Detroit Tigers, and was a mainstay of the Pirates pitching staff until he was caught up in the so-called ABC Mutiny that led to his release by the team. Adams had a career 194-140 record, and a 2.76 career ERA.
BORN 5.18.1882, Tipton, IN.

Fred Dunlap
(1880-1890)
In 1884, with the Union Association's St. Louis Maroons, second baseman Dunlap (nicknamed "Sure Shot") set a record with 1.58 runs per game. He scored 160 times in 101 games, with 185 hits and a .412 BA.
BORN 5.21.1859, Philadelphia, PA     .292, 41, 366

Frank Selee
(1890-1905)
Selee managed the Boston Beaneaters from 1890 to 1901 and ended up with five pennants and a record of 1,004-649. Selee's greatest gift was finding young talent -- to wit, players like Kid Nichols and Vic Willis. Selee was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.
BORN 10.26.1859, Denver, CO

John Montgomery Ward
(1878-94)
A Hall of Famer, Ward was a graduate of Columbia Law School who was one of the founders of the Brotherhood of Professional Base Ball Players,  which was created to fight the reserve clause. He played for the Providence Grays and the New York Giants, among other clubs, and was proficient as an infielder, an outfielder, and as a pitcher (a career 2.49 ERA). Ward is the only player in major league history to have won more than 150 games as a pitcher while accumulating more than 2,000 hits as a batter. According to Joe Tinker, Ward was "a star outfielder, a brilliant infielder, and a better pitcher than [Old Hoss] Radbourn. And he was one of the best baserunners who ever lived."
BORN 3.3.1860, Bellefonte, PA     .275, 26, 867

George Foster
(1969-86)
In his day Foster was one of the best sluggers in the majors, leading the league in home runs twice (1977, 1978) and RBIs three times (1976, 1977, 1978). In 1977 he earned MVP honors with 52 homers and 149 ribbies, and had a batting average over .300 four times.
BORN 12.1.48, Tuscaloosa, AL     .274, 348, 1239

Ross Barnes
(1871-77, 1879, 1881)
Second baseman Ross Barnes played for the Chicago White Stockings in 1876 (the first major league season), and became the first National League batting champion with a .429 BA, scoring 126 runs in 66 games. At the time, any ball that hit fair and then rolled our bounced into foul territory was considered a fair ball, and Barnes had perfected the art of doing just that. When the rule was changed in 1877 requiring that a hit ball pass a base before being considered fairly struck, Barnes ceased to be an offensive threat.
BORN 5.8. 1850, Mount Morris, NY     .359, 6, 350

Joe Borden
(1875-76)
Borden has the distinction of being the first pitcher to throw a no-hitter in a professional game when his Philadelphia Whites defeated the Chicago White Stockings 4-0. A year later (1876), Borden recorded the first no-hitter in the National League.
BORN: 5.9.1854, Jacobstown, NJ     13-16, 2.60

Vince Coleman
(1985-1997)
Playing for the Cardinals, Coleman set a rookie record by stealing 110 bases. He set another record by swiping 100 or more bases in three consecutive seasons (1985-87). In 1988 and 1989 he collected yet another record by stealing 50 consecutive bases without being caught in each year.
"Vincent van Go"     Born 9.22.61, Jacksonville, FL     .264, 28, 346 (752 SB)  
All-Star 1988, 1989     1985 NL ROY

Moose Stubing
(1967)
Stubing's career as a player lasted just five games in 1967 with the California Angels. In 1988 he was called upon to manage the Angels for the last eight games of 1988 following the firing of field general Cookie Rojas. Stubing lost all eight games, tying George Creamer (1884, Pittsburgh Alleghenys) for the record of most managerial losses without a win.
BORN: 3.31.38, Bronx, NY
Tony Gwynn
(1982-2001)
Gwynn became the first NL hitter since Stan Musial (1952) to win three consecutive batting crowns, with averages of .370 in 1987, .313 in 1988, and .336 in 1989. The 1987 average of .370 was the best in the NL since 1948, while 1988's .313 was the lowest ever to win a NL batting title.
BORN: 5.9.60, Los Angeles, CA     .338, 135, 1138
All-Star 1984-87, 1989-99     Gold Glove 1986-87, 1989-91     Silver Slugger 1984, 1986-87, 1989, 1994-95, 1997